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Book Of Genesis – Lesson #25

Lesson 25:  Genesis 41-43 

Read Gen. 41:1-13

When none of the magicians of Egyptcould interpret Pharaoh’s dreams of the seven fat and seven ugly and gaunt cows, of the seven plump and good ears and seven thin heads of grain, then the chief butler remembered Joseph and his ability to interpret dreams. The two full years mentioned in Gen. 41:1 may refer either to the time of Joseph’s imprisonment or the time since the chief butler’s release. Continue Reading Here

Book Of Genesis – Lesson #24

Lesson 24:  Genesis 38;  Genesis 39; and Genesis 40 

Read Genesis 38:1-11

The sordid story of Judah’s sin with Tamar serves to magnify the grace of God when we remember that the Lord Jesus was descended from Judah (Luke 3:33). Tamar is one of five women mentioned in the genealogy in Matthew 1; three of them were guilty of immorality—Tamar, Rahab (v. 5), and Bathsheba (v. 6). The others are Ruth, a Gentile (v. 5) and Mary, a godly virgin (v. 16). There is a deeper and typological meaning to this story of moral failure.  Genesis 37 closes with an account of Jacob’s sons selling their brother Joseph unto the Midianites, and they in turn selling him into Egypt. This speaks, in type, of Christ being rejected by Israel and delivered unto the Gentiles. From the time that the Jewish leaders delivered their Messiah into the hands of Pilate, they have (as a nation) had no further dealings with Him; and God, too, has turned the focus from them to the Gentiles. Hence it is that there is an important turn in our type at this stage. Joseph is now seen in the hands of the Gentiles. But before we are told what happened to Joseph in Egypt, the Holy Spirit traces for us, in typical outline, the history of the Jewish nation, while the antitypical Joseph is absent from the land.  It is no accident that the story of Joseph is interrupted by chapter 38. The disreputable behavior of other members of Joseph’s family makes his conduct, by contrast, shine like a bright light in a sordid world. Continue Reading Here

Book Of Genesis – Lesson #19

Lesson 19:  Genesis 27 & Genesis 28

Read  Genesis 27:1-22

Approximately thirty-seven years have passed since the events of the previous chapter. Isaac is now 137, his sight has failed, and he thinks he is about to die, perhaps because his brother Ishmael had died at that age (Gen. 25:17). But he will live forty-three more years.

When Isaac craved some venison from Esau, promising a blessing in return, Rebekah plotted to deceive her husband and to get the blessing for Jacob, whom she loved. Her trickery was unnecessary because God had already promised the blessing to Jacob (Gen. 25:23b). She cooked goat’s meat so that it tasted like savory venison, and put the goat’s skins on Jacob’s arms to impersonate the hairy Esau. Isaac made the mistake of trusting his feelings; the hairy arm “felt” like Esau’s. We should not trust our emotional feelings in spiritual matters. As Martin Luther observed: Continue Reading Here

Book Of Genesis – Lesson #18

Chapters 25 & 26

Read Genesis 25:1-18   

In 1 Chronicles 1:32 Keturah is called Abraham’s concubine. Verse 6 seems to confirm this. Thus she was a lesser wife, one who did not enjoy the full privileges of a wife in the home. Once again God records marital irregularities that He never approved.

Abraham breathed his last at one hundred and seventy-five years of age and became the second person to be buried in the cave at Hebron. The twelve sons of Ishmael listed in Gen. 25:12-16 fulfilled God’s promise to Abraham: “He shall beget twelve princes” (Gen. 17:20). With the death of Ishmael, Isaac moves to center stage in the narrative. Continue Reading Here

Book Of Genesis – Lesson #9

Lesson 9:

Read Genesis 11:10-32

These verses trace the line of Shem to Abram. Thus the historical record narrows from the human race to one branch of that race (the Semites) and then to one man (Abram), who becomes the head of the Hebrew nation. The rest of the Old Testament is largely a history of this nation.

Abram was a mighty man of faith and one of the most important men in history. Three world religions venerate him. He is mentioned in sixteen books of the Old Testament and eleven books of the New Testament.  His name means “exalted father” or, as changed to Abraham, “father of a multitude.” Continue Reading Here

Commentary: Remember And Be Remembered

By:  Pastor Roy Crane

To listen to Pastor Roy’s Sermon on this subject,  click here.

Scripture Reference: Malachi 3:16-17 and Hebrews 10:19-25

MEMORIAL – – A monument,  statue, holiday,  or ritual that serves as a remembrance or reminder of a person or an event. The Feast of the Passover was a memorial of God’s sparing the firstborn of the Israelites in Egypt and of Israel’s deliverance from Egyptian bondage (Ex. 12:14). When Israel crossed the Jordan River and occupied the Promised Land, Joshua commanded that 12 stones, representing the 12 tribes of Israel, be set up in the midst of the Jordan (Josh. 4:9). “These stones,” he said, “shall be for a memorial to the children of Israel forever” (Josh. 4:7). When Jesus was in the house of Simon the leper, a woman anointed His head with oil. “Wherever this gospel is preached in the whole world,” said Jesus, “what this woman has done will also be told as a memorial to her” (Matt. 26:13; Mark 14:9). On the eve of His crucifixion Jesus instituted the Lord’s Supper (Luke 22:19). The observance of the Lord’s Supper is an ongoing Christian memorial that helps believers remember the sacrifice of Christ on their behalf (1 Cor. 5:7; 11:25–26).

The exhortation in Hebrews 10 assumes that all believers are now priests because we are told to have boldness to enter the Holiest by the blood of Jesus. The common people during the Jewish economy were barred from the Holy Place and the Most Holy Place; only the priests could enter the first room, and only the high priest could enter the second. Now that is all changed. God has no special place where only a special caste of men may approach Him. Instead, all believers may come into His presence by faith at any time and from any place on earth.

Our approach is by a new and living way. Let us draw near. This is the believer’s blood-bought privilege. How wonderful beyond all words that we are invited to have audience, not with this world’s celebrities, but with the Sovereign of the universe! The extent to which we value the invitation is shown by the manner in which we respond to it.
 
There is a fourfold description of how we should be spiritually groomed in entering the throne room.
 
1.With a true heart. The people of Israel drew near to God with their mouth, and honored Him with their lips, but their heart was often far from Him (Matt. 15:8). Our approach should be with utter sincerity.

 2.In full assurance of faith. We draw near with utter confidence in the promises of God and with the firm conviction that we shall have a gracious reception into His presence.

 
3. Having our hearts sprinkled from an evil conscience. This can be brought about only by the new birth. When we trust Christ, we appropriate the value of His blood. Figuratively speaking, we sprinkle our hearts with it, just as the Israelites sprinkled their doors with the blood of the Passover lamb. This delivers us from an evil conscience.

4. And our bodies washed with pure water. Again this is symbolic language. Our bodies represent our lives. The pure water might refer either to the word (Eph 5:25, 26), to the Holy Spirit (John 7:37–39), or to the Holy Spirit using the word in cleansing our lives from daily defilement.

Then we should continue to meet together and not desert the local fellowship, as some do. This may be considered as a general exhortation for all believers to be faithful in their church attendance. Without question we find strength, comfort, nourishment, and joy in collective worship and service.  It may also be looked on as a special encouragement for Christians going through times of persecution.

There is always the temptation to isolate oneself in order to avoid arrest, reproach, and suffering, and thus to be a secret disciple.  But basically the verse is a warning against apostasy. To forsake the local assembly here means to turn one’s back on Christianity. Some were doing this when this Letter was written. There was need to exhort one another, especially in view of the nearness of Christ’s Return. When He comes, the persecuted, ostracized, despised believers will be seen to be on the winning side. Until then, there is need for steadfastness.