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Sermon Audio: More Hard Sayings

Scripture Reference:  2 Thessalonians 1:3-12

Bible Study: The Book Of Haggai

The Book Of Haggai

“Few prophets have succeeded in packing into such brief compass so much spiritual common sense as Haggai did.” —Frank E. Gaebelein

The unique thrust of this second shortest book in the OT is simple: Rebuild the temple! The remnant that had returned to Palestine to rebuild had let the work stand idle for sixteen years and so Haggai was commissioned to exhort the lethargic Jews to get to work. Haggai expands his message to include judgment on ungodly nations, as well as future glory for God’s people.

Haggai may have been born on a Jewish holiday since his name means “festal” or “festive.” He is the sole character in the OT with this name. Or, perhaps he was named by believing parents in hopes of a future joyful restoration, since he was likely born in exile. Continue Reading Here

Bible Study: The Book of Zephaniah

The Book of Zephaniah

“If anyone wishes all the secret oracles of the prophets to be given in a brief compendium, let him read through this brief Zephaniah.” —Martin Bucer (1528)

We know very little about Zephaniah the son of Cushi. His name means Jehovah hides, i.e., “protects” or “treasures.” He liked to put dark against light and light against dark, painting a very gloomy picture of the Day of the Lord, yet giving a very bright foreglimpse of Israel’s coming glory and the conversion of the Gentiles to the Lord. As Bible Commentator Hewitt points out, the Prophet Zephaniah minced no words: There is no compromise in the language used. He denounces sin and announces judgment with perfect fearlessness and closes his book with a song full of inspiration and hope looking forward to the inauguration of the Millennial Kingdom.

Zephaniah ministered during the reign of Josiah (640–609 B.C.). The book was probably written between 621 and 612 B.C.

Zephaniah probably prophesied from Jerusalem (“this place,” 1:4). The historical background of his prophecy will be found in 2 Kings 21–23 and the early chapters of Jeremiah: Continue Reading Here

Bible Study: The Book Of Jonah

The Book Of Jonah

“The book is unique in that it is more concerned with the prophet himself than with his prophecy. The condition of his soul, and God’s loving discipline of him, instruct and humble the reader.” —George Williams

Jonah (Heb. for dove) is the only one among the prophets whose prophecy does not consist of what he said but rather of his own life and experience. His experience portrays the past, present, and future of the nation of Israel, as follows:
1. Intended to be a witness for God to the Gentiles.
2. Jealous that a message of grace should be extended to the Gentiles.
3. Thrown into the sea (Gentile world) and swallowed by the nations, yet not assimilated by them.
4. Cast upon dry land (restored to the land of Israel) and made a blessing to the nations.

Continue Reading Here